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Citrus & Avocado Salad

When we were growing up, our health-conscious mom gave us some form of citrus fruit nearly every day, especially in the winter, since that’s when citrus is in season and when she thought we could use an additional boost of vitamin C to keep the cold and flu away.  Often she’d serve half a grapefruit at breakfast and we’d scoop out each section of the inside with a spoon.  If she didn’t serve us citrus fruit at lunch or breakfast, our mom would surely add it to our nightly appetizer salad. 🙂 As much as we appreciated all the healthy food she fed us as kids, now as registered dietitians we truly appreciate it!  We’re always whipping up dishes inspired by our Mom, and this Citrus and Avocado Salad is no exception.  Rock on Mom! 🙂

 

Looking for more healthy salad recipes? Here are a few to try!

Crunchy Zesty Cucumber Cantaloup

Watermelon Mint Detox Salad

Veggie Bean Salad with Dijon Vinaigrette 

Spinach Berry Balsamic Glazed Chicken Salad with Raspberry Chia Vinaigrette

Whether the middle of summer or the thick of winter, what better than a bright citrus filled salad to brighten your day, while flooding your body with immune boosting vitamin C?   The sweet citrus fruit paired with the creamy avocado adds the perfect balance of sweet flavor with the creamy texture from the avocado, whose good-for-you-fat acts as a nutrient booster and enhances the absorption of fat soluble vitamins like carotenoids in citrus fruit.   Pair this salad with grilled chicken or fish for a delish lunch or dinner!  One of the best parts about this salad?  Use whatever citrus fruit you have in the house—or choose your favorite—or combine them all!

Makes 4 servings

Ingredients

Salad

3  citrus fruit*

1/2 avocado

2 cups of lettuce, chopped**

*use your favorite; try something new—any sweet citrus fruit will work. We used blood orange, tangelo, clementines (or mandarins).

**we used a mix of spring greens and romaine this time, but we think butter lettuce would be a nice addition.

Dressing

1/4 cup fresh squeezed orange juice*

1 1/2 TBSP extra virgin olive oil

1 large garlic clove, finely minced or grated

a pinch of both salt & pepper

*we used fresh squeezed navel orange juice (we originally bought every variety of citrus we could find 😉 so we figured we’d use fresh squeezed, bottled 100% orange juice works as well)

Directions

  1. First, prepare the dressing to give your ingredients time to mingle before pouring over the salad. Start by  mixing all of the dressing ingredients together in a small jar or dressing container and shake well. Set aside.
  1. Slice citrus and remove the peels and as much of the pith as possible. We sliced from the top down into thin slices. Once the peel is removed, gently pull the slices apart to make them bite size.
  1. Dice the avocado.
  1. Assemble the salad, and then divide into 4 equal portions.
  1. Drizzle a tablespoon of dressing over one serving and enjoy!

Serve with a side of your favorite fish, chicken or bean dish for a delish lunch or dinner!

89 Calories, 4g carbs, 1 g fat, 2g protein, 3 mg sodium, 3 g fiber

Citrus & Avocado Salad
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • 3 sections of citrus fruit*
  • ½ avocado
  • 2 cups of lettuce, chopped**
  • ¼ cup fresh squeezed orange juice***
  • 1½ TBSP extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 large garlic clove, finely minced or grated
  • a pinch of both salt & pepper
Instructions
  1. First, prepare the dressing to give your ingredients time to mingle before pouring over the salad. Start by mixing all of the dressing ingredients together in a small jar or dressing container and shake well. Set aside.
  2. Slice citrus and remove the peels and as much of the pith as possible. We sliced from the top down into thin slices. Once the peel is removed, gently pull the slices apart to make them bite size.
  3. Dice the avocado.
  4. Assemble the salad, and then divide into 4 equal portions.
  5. Drizzle a tablespoon of dressing over one serving and enjoy!
Notes
*use your favorite; try something new—any sweet citrus fruit will work. We used blood orange, tangelo, clementines (or mandarins).
**we used a mix of spring greens and romaine this time, but we think butter lettuce would be a nice addition.
***we used fresh squeezed navel orange juice (we originally bought every variety of citrus we could find 😉 so we figured we’d use fresh squeezed, bottled 100% orange juice works as well)
Nutrition Information
Serving size: 4 Calories: 89 Fat: 4g Saturated fat: 1g Sodium: 3mg Fiber: 3g Protein: 2g

Should You Exercise When You’re Sick?

 

Growing up as athletic kids with an overprotective mom, we knew when to let her know when we were feeling sick and when not to.  After all, on one hand, if we were sick in her household, she was even more doting than ever.  She wanted us instantly better so we had a bell next to our bedside, and any time we rang it meant tons of love and attention, homemade soup, OJ… you name it. 🙂

But on the other hand, if she thought we were sick or heading that way, there was no sports practice, no splashing around in the chilly creek, etc., until we got better.  And even though she followed the golden rule–if you feel it in the neck and above, exercise is OK and if it’s below the neck, exercise is out, she still wondered if it would make us sicker if she allowed us to exercise even if we only felt it from the neck up. 

5 Steps to a Bullet Proof Immune System

Our clients frequently ask us this too.  So, should you work out if you’re feeling sick? After all, a light to moderate workout may  make you feel better…

Answer:

Mom was right.  Use the “neck rule”: If your symptoms are above the neck (think sneezing, running or stuffy nose, sinus pressure, etc., then breaking a sweat is considered safe.

  • Even 20 minutes of exercise may make you feel better.  The key however, is to listen to your body–and realize that you may not be up for your typical level of exercise intensity.

 

  • Try speed walking for 20 minutes, which may make you feel better.  If your sinuses are clogged, exercise may open up your nasal passages and taking some deeper breaths from the exercise may be helpful, too.

 

  • Yoga increases blood flow and lowers anxiety.  If you feel fine jogging, it acts as a decongestant, too.

 

  • Skip endurance training or high intensity training.

 

  • If exercise makes you feel worse, stop.

 

Symptoms below the neck? If you have flu-like symptoms like body aches, nausea or vomiting or chest congestion and other symptoms, working out should be tabled and you should be chaired–or in the bed. 🙂

 

 

Remember, research shows that those who exercise regularly tend to get sick less frequently.  And exercising helps to boost immunity. (Just remember that exercising too much and too intensely can do just the opposite.).